Dispute Resolution Committee: Ouagadougou Political Agreement (OPA)

OUAGADOUGOU POLITICAL AGREEMENT 

VII. Follow-up and consultation mechanisms

In order to ensure follow-up to this Agreement and continuation of the direct dialogue, the Parties agree to establish a permanent consultation mechanism (CPC) and an evaluation and monitoring committee (CEA).

7.1. Permanent consultation mechanism (CPC)
The permanent consultation mechanism is an organ for monitoring and permanent dialogue aimed at strengthening national unity.

Its membership is as follows:
Mr. Laurent GBAGBO, President of the Republic
Mr. Guillaume K. SORO, Secretary-General of Forces nouvelles
Mr. Alassane Dramane OUATTARA, leader of RDR
Mr. Henri Konan BEDIE, leader of PDCI
Mr. Blaise COMPAORE, current Chairman of ECOWAS, in his capacity as Facilitator.
Except for President Laurent GBAGBO and the current Chairman of ECOWAS, the other members of CPC are all heads of institutions. CPC is competent to consider any issue related to this Agreement.

Implementation History

2007

Intermediate Implementation

The Ouagadougou Political Agreement had a provision for the establishment of the Permanent Consultation Mechanism (CPC), also known as the Permanent Consultative Framework (Cadre Permanent de Consultation), which had peace process stakeholders, including the President of the Republic (Laurent Gbagbo), the Secretary General of Nouvelles, representatives of other political parties, and the chairman of the Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS). This mechanism was instituted to address all issues related to the accord.

As of June 2007, the CPC had been established. It had its first meeting on 12 June 2007. Because there was a delay in implementing the accord, CPC called on the Prime Minister to address the causes of delay.1

  • 1. “Fourteenth progress report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire,” United Nations Security Council (S/2007/ 593), October 1, 2007.
2008

Intermediate Implementation

The Permanent Consultative Framework (i.e., the CPC) met on 24 January and called on the government to expedite the electoral process.2 After the CPC meeting in May, supplementary mobile courts were deployed to issue birth certificate duplicates.3 In its 10 November meeting, the CPC recommended that the Independent Election Commission (CEI) establish a new timeline for the identification of the population and voter registration before 31 December, as it had become impossible to hold elections on 30 November due to technical difficulties related to these two issues.4

  • 2. “Sixteenth progress report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire,” United Nations Security Council (S/2008/250), April 15, 2008.
  • 3. “Eighteenth progress report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire,” United Nations Security Council (S/2008/645), October 13, 2008.
  • 4. “Nineteenth progress report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire,” United Nations Security Council (S/2009/21), January 8, 2009.
2009

Full Implementation

In its fifth meeting held on 18 May, the Permanent Consultative Framework endorsed dates for presidential elections and agreed to complete the voter registration process for 29 November and 30 June, respectively.5 Because the election could not take place due to technical issues related to the identification of the population and completing the voter rolls, in its 3 December meeting the CPC endorsed a new timeline for the implementation of key provisions of the accord. The final electoral list was to be settled in January, identity and voter cards were to be distributed in February, and elections were to be held by early March 2010.6

  • 5. “Twenty-first progress report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire,” United Nations Security Council (S/2009/344), July 7, 2009.
  • 6. “Twenty-third progress report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire,” United Nations Security Council (S/2010/15), January 7, 2010.
2010

Full Implementation

The CPC had its meeting on 21 September 2010. Along with welcoming the validation of the voter list by the Independent Electoral Commission, it also welcomed the presidential decree to distribute 5,725,720 national identity cards, along with allowing an estimated 55,000 persons to submit identity documents.7

  • 7. “Progress report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire,” United Nations Security Council (S/2010/537), October 18, 2010.
2011

Full Implementation

There was no information regarding the activities of the Permanent Consultative Framework in 2010. This could be related to disputes related to the runoff presidential elections that essentially made the multiparty framework obsolete. Nevertheless, establishing the framework early in the implementation process was critical for the successful implementation of the accord.

2012

Full Implementation

The Permanent Consultative Framework became obsolete after presidential elections in 2010. Holding presidential elections signified the successful implementation of the accord’s provision, and the CPC played an important role in this regard.

2012

Full Implementation

 No further developments observed.

2014

Full Implementation

 No further developments observed.

2015

Full Implementation

 No further developments observed.