Disarmament: Comprehensive Peace Agreement

4.2. All the arms and ammunitions shall be securely stored within the cantonments except those needed for providing security to the cantonments after the Maoist combatants are sent to the cantonments. The arms and ammunitions shall be locked with a single padlock and the side concerned shall keep the key to it. For the UN to monitor it, a device with siren as well as recording facility shall be installed during the process of padlocking. The UN shall make necessary inspections of the stored arms in the presence of the party concerned. Technical details in this regard including camera monitoring shall be as per the agreement among the United Nations, the CPN (Maoist) and the Government of Nepal.

4.6. The Nepali Army shall be confined to the barracks as per the commitments made in the letters sent to the United Nations. Non-use of its arms for or against either side shall be guaranteed. Like number of arms as those stored by the Maoist Army shall be safely stored also by the Nepali Army. These arms shall be locked with a single padlock and the party concerned shall keep the key to it. For the UN to monitor it, a device with siren as well as recording facility shall be installed during the process of padlocking. The UN shall make necessary inspections of the stored arms in the presence of the party concerned. Technical details in this regard including camera monitoring shall be as per the agreement among the United Nations, the Government of Nepal and the CPN (Maoist).

Implementation History

2006

No Implementation

The 2006 CPA does not specifically call for disarmament. Rather, the CPA and the subsequent Agreement on Monitoring of the Management of Arms and Armies (AMMAA) signed on 8 December 2006, demand that all Maoist weaponry be securely stored within a cantonment. These arms must be sealed within the container, which must have a single-lock and the key must be given to the concerned party. The containers were to be monitored by the UN. The Nepal Army was said to have placed an equivalent number of weapons, to those stored by the Maoist army, under around-the-clock United Nations’ monitoring.

2007

Intermediate Implementation

According to the CPA and the subsequent AMMAA agreement, 3,475 Maoist weapons were registered and stored in one location. The process was completed in April 2007. In accordance with the agreement, 2,855 weapons from the Nepal Army were registered and stored. Among the weapons registered by the Maoists, 96 were retained outside the cantonments for the security of the Maoist leaders.1 This development is recognized as the complete implementation of the CPA. Nevertheless, these weapons were not fully detached from the combatants.

  • 1. "Secretary General’s Report to the Security Council," United Nations (S/2007/235), April 26, 2007.
2008

Intermediate Implementation

Arms that had belonged to the Maoists were securely stored and monitored by the UNMIN. The Nepal Army, matching this number, stored the same amount of weapons. 

2009

Intermediate Implementation

No developments observed this year.

2010

Intermediate Implementation

No developments observed this year.

2011

Intermediate Implementation

Arms that had belonged to the Maoists were securely stored and monitored by the UNMIN. The Nepal Army, matching this number, stored the same amount of weapons. The UNMIN left Nepal in January 2011, at which point the Special Committee started monitoring the cantonments and arms. As the deadline for the extension of the Constituent Assembly loomed, the Nepali Congress Party, as a pre-condition to extending the tenure of the CA, demanded that the weapons stored in the cantonments be handed over to the government and that state security personnel be deployed to supervise the cantonment sites.2 In the end, the Maoists agreed to return their own security, but refused to hand over the key to the arms container. However, as of 7 August 2011, Maoist combatants had not been allowed to return to duty as security guards for their leaders.3

On 27 August 2011, a day ahead of the election for the Prime Minister, the remaining combatants providing security to the Maoists leaders, especially Vice-chairman Mohan Baidya, were returned to the cantonment.4

  • 2. "Peace process: NC, Maoist war on weapons handover goes on," Kathmandu Post, May 26, 2011.
  • 3. "Special Committee meet put off," Republica, August 8, 2011.
  • 4. Republica, August 28, 2011.
2012

Full Implementation

Disarmament process can be said completed in April when the Maoist party allowed the Nepal Army to take control of its weapons locked in boxes. Within a day, the Nepal Army took control of all weapons in the cantonment sites.5

  • 5. "Army takes charge of PLA fighters, weapons," Kathmandu Post, April 10, 2012.
2013

Full Implementation

No further development reported.

2014

Full Implementation

No further development reported.

2015

Full Implementation

No further development reported.