Donor Support: Lomé Peace Agreement

ARTICLE II CEASEFIRE MONITORING

3. The parties shall seek the assistance of the International Community in providing funds and other logistics to enable the JMC to carry out its mandate.

ARTICLE III TRANSFORMATION OF THE RUF INTO A POLITICAL PARTY

4. The Parties shall approach the International Community with a view to mobilizing resources for the purposes of enabling the RUF to function as a political party. These resources may include but shall not be limited to:

(i) Setting up a trust fund;
(ii) Training for RUF membership in party organization and functions; and
(iii) Providing any other assistance necessary for achieving the goals of this section.

ARTICLE XVI ENCAMPMENT, DISARMAMENT, DEMOBILIZATION AND REINTEGRATION

4. Upon the signing of the present Agreement, the Government of Sierra Leone shall immediately request the International Community to assist with the provision of the necessary financial and technical resources needed for the adaptation and extension of the existing Encampment, Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration Programme in Sierra Leone, including payment of retirement benefits and other emoluments due to former members of the SLA.

ARTICLE XXVIII POST-WAR REHABILITATION AND RECONSTRUCTION

1. The Government, through the National Commission for Resettlement, Rehabilitation and Reconstruction and with the support of the International Community, shall provide appropriate financial and technical resources for post-war rehabilitation, reconstruction and development.

ARTICLE XXIX SPECIAL FUND FOR WAR VICTIMS

The Government, with the support of the International Community, shall design and implement a programme for the rehabilitation of war victims. For this purpose, a special fund shall be set up.

Implementation History

1999

Intermediate Implementation

Immediately following the signing of the Lomé Agreement, UN General Secretary Annan recommended that the UN encourage donor countries to make contributions towards the reconstruction of war ravaged Sierra Leone.1

Sierra Leone received international support for the DDR program. Funding for the program, which was led by the World Bank, was expected to cost $33 million. The DDR was financed by a Trust Fund set up by the World Bank in agreement with donor countries.2 Support from the international community for reconstruction and rehabilitation in Sierra Leone was very minimal in comparison to donors’ one billion dollar support for Rwandan refugee camps.3

  • 1. "UN calls for concerted efforts to re-build Sierra Leone," Deutsche Presse-Agentur, July 10, 1999.
  • 2. "Sierra Leone; Sierra Leone Fact Sheet #1," Africa News, October 7, 1999.
  • 3. "Pay up to keep the peace; Sierra Leone badly needs foreign help to recover from its civil war," The Guardian (London), October 11, 1999.
2000

Intermediate Implementation

The Security Council, in its Resolution 1289 (February 4, 2000), asked the international community for, “sustained and generous assistance for the longer terms tasks of peace-building, reconstruction, economic and social recovery and development in Sierra Leone, and urges all States and international and other organizations to provide such assistance as a priority”(p.4).

2001

Minimum Implementation

Donors at a World Bank conference, held from June 11-12, 2001, failed to offer specific commitments to replenish the multimillion-dollar Trust Fund set up for war-weary Sierra Leone. “With just US $6 million dollars left in the fund, the Sierra Leonean government expects this to last no later than August, the World Bank Country Director for Sierra Leone told reporters in Paris. The money was being used to pay for post-war reconstruction and socioeconomic development.4

  • 4. "Sierra Leone; Donors Fail to Pledge Reconstruction Money," Africa News, June 13, 2001.
2002

Minimum Implementation

“A delegation of donors from 12 counties ended a week-long mission to Sierra Leone on Friday declaring that although peace had come, the problems and needs facing the country were ‘enormous,’ the UN Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) reported. Alan Doss, the Deputy Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Governance and Stabilisation, told reporters that the response from donors was ‘extremely positive,’ as Sierra Leone moved from emergency relief to the reconstruction phase, UNAMSIL reported. The purpose of the visit, Doss said, was not to make financial pledges but to discuss with the government the prospects and priorities for reintegration and recovery."5

  • 5. "Sierra Leone; Donor Team Says Needs Are 'Enormous,'" Africa News, February 11, 2002.
2003

Minimum Implementation

No additional information available on donor support.

2004

Minimum Implementation

“Sierra Leoneans from all walks of society would participate in a two-day donor conference scheduled to take place on September 4 and 5 in Maryland, USA in a bid to rebuild and develop the Marampa Chiefdom in Lunsar, Port Loko district, and other parts of the country destroyed during the decade old conflict. The programme organized by the Marampa Self Help project, a non-profiting making organization that has reconstructed over 12 houses destroyed during the war in that township, would bring together Sierra Leoneans in the Diaspora to contribute meaningfully to post-war development exercise in the country."6 

  • 6. "Sierra Leone; Donor Conference for Sierra Leone in America," Africa News, August 24, 2004.
2005

Minimum Implementation

No additional information was available on donor support in 2005 related to the Lomé Agreement. There was still insufficient funding for reparations to war victims.

2006

Minimum Implementation

No further developments observed.

2007

Minimum Implementation

No further developments observed.

2008

Minimum Implementation

No further developments observed.

2009

No further developments observed.