Donor Support: Agreement Between the Republic Niger Government and the ORA

1995 PEACE AGREEMENT

Clause 22

In order to reinforce and to enlarge to the zone affected by the conflict activities already undertaken within the framework of urgency assistance concerning food, health and schooling foreseen in the Peace Agreement of Ouagadougou, October 9 1994, the Government, together with the ORA and concerned populations, engages to establish, on the basis of available statistics on displaced persons and of those already at home, the real needs of urgent help to be introduced in a global programme. This programme will be submitted by the Government to donors at a timely moment.

Clause 23

The Government will organize a round-table conference including countries with a friendly attitude to Niger and International Organisations for the financing of the economic and social programme of the present Agreement.

Implementation History

1995

No Implementation

Niger’s economy is on the verge of collapse. Therefore, Niger makes an agreement with the World Bank and IMF to implement structural reform programs, which was designed to downsize the state’s involvement in the economic issues and promote privatization. For this project, Niger received a loan of 102 million dollars under the bank's Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility (ESAF).1  This loan, however, cannot be coded as donor support to the peace process. The roundtable of donors as agreed in the peace agreement did not take place. 

  • 1. "Niger Niamey Resumes Relations IMF And World Bank," Africa News, December, 1995.
1996

No Implementation

No report of donor support to the peace process. After the military coup in 1996, Niger's main aid donors, including the former colonial power, France, and the United States, suspended badly needed aid after the coup.2 

  • 2. "World News Briefs; Niger's Military Rulers Set Election Timetable," The New York Times, February 13, 1996.
1997

No Implementation

No report of donor support to the peace process.

1998

No Implementation

No report of donor support to the peace process.

1999

No Implementation

France, which was the major donor providing resources to implement the peace process suspended cooperation. 

2000

No Implementation

No report of donor support to the peace process.

2001

Intermediate Implementation

Niger received US $695,000, from the UNV's Special Voluntary Fund to train and support
660 former guerrillas in agricultural micro-projects so they could be self-reliant.3

In a separate report, it was reported that the France provided US $130,000 to Niger as part of its ongoing support for the reintegration into civilian life of former fighters who participated in an armed rebellion in the southeastern region of Diffa between 1994 and 1998.4

  • 3. "Niger; Ex-Fighters In Reintegration Programme," Africa News, March 16, 2001.
  • 4. "Niger; France Supports Programme for Ex-Fighters," Africa News, July 4, 2001.
2002

Intermediate Implementation

No further information available except for the continuation of the UN and French support to reintegrate ex-combatants into society.

2003

Intermediate Implementation

No further information available except for the continuation of the UN and French support to reintegrate ex-combatants into society.

2004

Intermediate Implementation

No further information available except for the continuation of the UN and French support to reintegrate ex-combatants into society. 

2005: UNDP/BCPR, France, Libya, Niger and the US provided financial support of $1.7 million to support the reintegration program for 2005 and 2006. In 2005, the government gave economic assistance to reintegrate the Tuareg rebel combatants into socio-economic life with $300 grants to each combatant in the form of micro-loans for projects in animal husbandry, the craft industry and vegetable gardening.5