Reintegration: General Agreement on the Establishment of Peace and National Accord in Tajikistan

Protocol on Military Issues (8 March 1997)

I. General Provisions

III. REFORM OF THE POWER STRUCTURES OF THE GOVERNMENT OF TAJIKISTAN

9. The reform of the power structures of the Government of Tajikistan shall take place on the basis of a re-evaluation of the personnel, including command personnel. This shall be conducted by the Joint Central Review Board within six months from the time when the Commission on National Reconciliation begins its work.

10. The Joint Central Review Board shall take its decisions on assignment to reserve status and reintegration into civilian life on the basis of three criteria: state of health, record of convictions prior to May 1992 and acknowledged professional unfitness.

11. Units formed by local authorities during the civil conflict (as civil defence forces, guard units, unsupervised formations, etc.) shall be disbanded within six months from the time when the Commission on National Reconciliation begins its work, and the formation of new units shall be halted. Persons expressing the wish to continue their service shall be integrated into the power structures of the Government of Tajikistan in accordance with the principles and procedures specified in paragraph 5 of the present Protocol. Members of these units not expressing the desire to continue their service, possessing a record of convictions prior to May 1992 or unfit for service on grounds of health shall be disarmed and reintegrated into civilian life.

Implementation History

1997

No Implementation

There were no active reintegration programs in 1997. UNMOT plans for a donor conference to be held in Vienna to fund reintegration programs in Tajikistan.1 

  • 1. "Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation in Tajikistan," United Nations (S/1997/859), November 5, 1997.
1998

No Implementation

There were no programs conducted in 1998 that offered training to former combatants. An integrated plan by the UN consisting of vocational training, resettlement grants and jobs for demobilized fighters was proposed and funding was being sought.2 

  • 2. Grant R. Smith, “Tajikistan: The Rocky Road to Peace,” Central Asian Survey 18, no. 2 (1999): 243-251.
1999

Minimum Implementation

No active or ongoing reintegration programs were found in 1999. Planning was reportedly underway for programs to become avtive in the year 2000. There were 836 former UTO fighters who gained employment in a UN project in the Karategin Valley.3 

  • 3. "Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation in Tajikistan," United Nations (S/1999/1127), November 4, 1999.
2000

Intermediate Implementation

Money from Norway, the United States and CIDA funded the first phase of a UNDP reintegration program in the Rasht Valley in the year 2000. More than 1100 fighters went through the rehabilitation project.4 

  • 4. A. Kannangara, N. Solijonov and S. Khoshmukhamedov, "Outcome Evaluation Report: Sustainable Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration of Ex-combatants and Conversion of Military Assets to Civilian Use," Dushanbe: UNDP Tajikistan, 2004.
2001

Intermediate Implementation

Rehabilitation and job training programs were ongoing in 2001 with funding from the European Commission (DG/RELEX), Japan, Belgium, and USAID in the Shaartuz and Kulyab areas.5 

2002

Intermediate Implementation

Rehabilitation and job training programs ended in 2002. A UN report on reintegration estimated that as many as 4,000 former soldiers had participated in a rehabilitation program and that 60% had found employment as self-employed farmers or entrepreneurs.6 

2003

Intermediate Implementation

No reintegration programs were found to be active in 2003.

2004

Intermediate Implementation

No reintegration programs were found to be active in 2004.

2005

Intermediate Implementation

No further developments observed.

2006

Intermediate Implementation

No further developments observed.