Police Reform: Agreement between the Republic of Indonesia and the Portuguese Republic on the question of East Timor

APPENDIX: PART THREE: POWERS AND INSTITUTIONS OF THE SARET

Article 22

The legislative power of the SARET shall extend to all matters not within the jurisdiction of the Central Government, as defined in Chapter I of Part One. This power shall include, the establishment of political, economic, and social policies in the SARET; cultural and educational matters; designation of a second language or languages in addition to the official language, Bahasa Indonesia; the establishment of courts of first instance pursuant to Article 40; rules of family law and succession; and public order, including the creation of an East Timor police force that shall be responsible for enforcement of all laws and regulations in the SARET, in accordance with the laws and regulations of the Republic of Indonesia.

Implementation History

1999

Minimum Implementation

The UNMISET assumed most of the administrative function including internal security once the referendum took place. From 1999 to 2002, the UNMISET assumed most of the activities related to the police force. 

2000

Minimum Implementation

The UNMISET assumed most of the administrative function including internal security once the referendum took place. From 1999 to 2002, the UNMISET assumed most of the activities related to the police force. 

2001

Minimum Implementation

The UNMISET assumed most of the administrative function including internal security once the referendum took place. From 1999 to 2002, the UNMISET assumed most of the activities related to the police force. 

2002

Minimum Implementation

The UNMISET assumed most of the administrative function including internal security once the referendum took place. From 1999 to 2002, the UNMISET assumed most of the activities related to the police force. 

2003

Intermediate Implementation

The UNMISET Civpol component gradually transferred full policing authority over to the PNTL throughout the year, first at the administrative and management level while retaining operational responsibility and later by relinquishing operational control of policing to the PNTL on a district-by-district basis. By March, 6/13 districts had been completely turned over to the PNTL; this number increased to 12/13 by October with the final district, Dili, to be turned over in January 2004. Civpol trainers continued to provide specialized training to select PNTL contingents, augmenting the crowd control capacity of the PNTL and continuing to focus on human rights training.1 

  • 1. "Secretary General's Reports to the UN Security Council,"United Nations Security Council (S/2003/243), March 3, 2003; (S/2003/449), April 21, 2003; (S/2003/944), October 6, 2003.
2004

Intermediate Implementation

While UNMISET transferred operational responsibility over policing in the last remaining district to the PNTL in January, it retained executive control over policing until 19 May 2004. By April, 3,021 PNTL personnel had been trained with an additional civilian support staff of 26. The UN mission in East Timor continued to provide training to the PNTL after 19 May with a reduced Civpol presence.2

  • 2. "Secretary General's Report to the UN Security Council," United Nations Security Council (S/2004/333), April 29, 2004.
2005

Intermediate Implementation

Once UNMISET’s mandate was completed, a new political mission, the United Nations Office in Timor-Leste (UNOTIL) supported the development of critical State institutions and police training in observance of democratic governance and human rights. UNOTIL was to continue to support the development of critical State institutions by providing up to 45 civilian advisers; to support further development of the police through the provision of up to 40 police advisers; and to bolster the development of the Border Patrol Unit (BPU) by providing up to 35 additional advisers.3

2006

Intermediate Implementation

UNOTIL’s mandate was scheduled to expire in May 2006. On 11 June 2006, the President of Timor-Leste, the President of the National Parliament and the Prime Minister requested that the Secretary-General propose to the Security Council to establish a United Nations police force in Timor-Leste to maintain law and order until the national police could undergo reorganization and restructuring. On 25 August 2006, the Security Council established UNMIT.4  

2007

Intermediate Implementation

Following the deployment of UNMIT, the overall situation in Timor-Leste improved, although the security situation in the country remained volatile.5  

2008

Intermediate Implementation

The national police have been responsible for policing throughout the country since March 2011, with no major issues. 6