Paramilitary Groups: Luena Memorandum of Understanding

B) DISENGAGEMENT, QUARTERING AND CONCLUSION OF THE DEMILITARIZATION OF UNITA MILITARY FORCES

3.4 The parties reiterate their engagement in the scrupulous fulfillment of their commitments and obligations related to the task of quartering and demilitarizing of UNITA Military Forces (in the spirit foreseen in Annex 3, point II. 1 of the Work Agenda - Military Issues I of the Lusaka Protocol).

3.5 In this regard, the Joint Military Commission, with the support of the General Staff of the Angolan Armed Forces, proceeds to the quartering and demilitarization of all units and paramilitary elements of UNITA Military Forces as follows:

a) Providing information, from the High General Staff of UNITA Military Forces to the Joint Military Commission, covering all reliable and verifiable data related to the combat and numerical composition and location of units and paramilitary elements of UNITA Military Forces.

b) The establishment of monitoring mechanisms for the process of demilitarizing UNITA Military Forces.

c) The identification of military units and paramilitary elements of UNITA Military Forces and the establishment of quartering areas for them.

d) The definition of respective itineraries and means of movement, as well as the actual movement to quartering areas by military units and paramilitary elements of UNITA Military Forces.

e) The disengagement from stationing locations and movement to quartering areas of military units and paramilitary elements of UNITA Military Forces.

f) The reception, housing and feeding, as well as registration in quartering areas of personnel from military units and paramilitary elements of UNITA Military Forces.

g) The turn-in and continuous process of collecting all armament and equipment of military units and paramilitary elements of UNITA Military Forces.

Implementation History

2002

Intermediate Implementation

According to the International Institute for Strategic Studies, UNITA consisted of some 100,000 troops and some 10,000 paramilitary members.1

UNITA troops were given 45 days to turn themselves in and began to travel to the assembly points identified in the Luena Agreement. UNITA General Samuel Chiwale, a member of the Supreme Command of UNITA forces, instructed his troops to report to the assembly points in the Luena agreement immediately.2

From April to May, some 25,000 UNITA troops had turned themselves in to the demobilization camps. It was estimated that UNITA’s force size was around 55,000 at the time of the Luena Accord in April 2002.3

  • 1. “Factfile on Angola,” Agence France Presse, April 2, 2003.
  • 2. “UNITA Forces in Northern Front Begin Implementing Luena Accord,” BBC Summary of World Broadcasts, April 4, 2002.
  • 3. “Angola Says 25,000 UNITA Rebels Now in Demob Camps,” Agence France Presse, May 3, 2002.
2003

Full Implementation

By the end of January, about 90,000 ex-soldiers had been registered in the assembly areas – 35,000 more troops than estimated.4

The government reported that 35 UNITA confinement areas, holding over 100,000 demobilized UNITA soldiers and their families, would be shut down by the end of February. Under the timeline of the Luena Memorandum of Understanding, the confinement areas would close by the end of 2002.5

  • 4. “Angola: Demobilisation and Reintegration Obstacles Highlighted,” Africa News, February 13, 2003.
  • 5. “Angola: UNITA Confinement Areas to Close Down by End of February,” BBC Summary of World Broadcasts, February 5, 2003.
2004

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2005

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2006

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2007

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2008

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2009

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2010

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2011

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.