Donor Support: Accord for a Firm and Lasting Peace

Agreement on the Strengthening of Civilian Power and the Role of the Armed Forces in Democratic Society (Mexico City, 19 September 1996)

IV. Executive Branch: B. Public security

International cooperation

31. The Parties urge the international community to grant such technical and financial cooperation as is required for the immediate implementation of all measures that will lead to the modernization and professionalization of the public security system in Guatemala.

Agreement on Resettlement of the Population Groups Uprooted by the Armed Conflict (Oslo, 17 June 1994)

IV. Resources and International Cooperation

3. The Parties recognize that the series of tasks relating to the resettlement of the uprooted population is of such breadth and complexity that the strong support of the international community is needed in order to complement the domestic efforts of the Government and of the various sectors of civil society. Otherwise, the Government’s commitment would be limited by financial constraints.

Implementation History

1997

Intermediate Implementation

The Secretary-General had established the Trust Fund for the Guatemalan Peace Process during early rounds of negotiations, and when the Agreement on a Firm and Lasting Peace was signed in 1996, the Secretariat and MINUGUA requested additional contributions from donors to help the Guatemalan Government implement the many new commitments. The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) worked closely with MINUGUA during the initial fundraising phase.1

  • 1. “United Nations Verification Mission in Guatemala: Report of the Secretary-General,” United Nations General Assembly (A/59/746), March 18, 2005.
1998

Intermediate Implementation

Donor support continued this year.

1999

Intermediate Implementation

Donor support continued this year.

2000

Intermediate Implementation

Donor support continued this year.

2001

Intermediate Implementation

Donor support continued this year.

2002

Intermediate Implementation

Donor support continued this year. In addition to bi-lateral support, the Inter-American Development Bank and other institutions lent 1.3 billion US dollars to Guatemala to get the peace process back on track in 2002.2

  • 2. “Guatemala,” Keesing's Record of World Events (Volume 48), February 2002, 44608.
2003

Intermediate Implementation

Donor support continued this year.

2004

Full Implementation

By the time MINUGUA's mandate expired in 2004, donations to the Trust Fund totaled 19.8 million US dollars. The donors were Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States, and the following countries provided UN Volunteers: Belgium, France, Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the UK. Forty-five percent of the funds were spent to improve the judiciary and human rights protections, twenty-one percent for public security (mainly the National Civilian Police), thirteen percent to the Program of Institutional Assistance for Legal Reform, ten percent for MINUGUA's public information programs, and seven percent for economic and social development. The balance of the Trust Fund was transferred to the National Transition Volunteer Programme when MINUGUA's mandate ended in late 2004.3

  • 3. “United Nations Verification Mission in Guatemala: Report of the Secretary-General,” United Nations General Assembly (A/59/746), March 18, 2005.
2005

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2006

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.