Disarmament: General Peace Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Senegal and MFDC

Clause one: The Purpose of the Present Agreement

2. The MFDC solemnly decides to definitively give up armed combat and the use of violence as a means to conduct the political combat which it wants to conduct.

3. The MFDC engages to billet, to disarm and to demobilize its military wing according to the procedures defined by the ANRAC.

Implementation History

2005

No Implementation

There was no mention of the disarmament program.

2006

No Implementation

By August 2006, the promised disarmament process had not been launched.1 In a news interview in October 2006, Koussaynobo Alphonse Diedhiou, coordinator of the National Agency for the Reconstruction of Casamance (ANRAC), said that "It is very difficult to realise a programme of demobilisation, disarmament and reintegration of the rebels, for example, without a peace process in place. There has not been a meeting between the MFDC and the government since 2004".2 In an interview, the Director General of ANRAC argued, “If they (MFDC) are serious about the peace negotiations then they should lay down their weapons. It’s their responsibility to draw up a list and present that to use. How would we know who’s in their rank and file? If they give us a list, we’ll demobilize them. But as long as there is no list, there will be no disarmament and demobilization”.3

  • 1. "Caught in the Cross-Fire, Growing up in Casamance,” United Nations Integrated Regional Information Networks, August 3, 2006.
  • 2. “No End to Region’s Longest-Running War,” United Nations Integrated Regional Information Networks, October 16, 2006
  • 3. Patty Chang, "No Development, No Peace? Demobilization and Reintegration in Casamance,” 2008 Annual International Studies Association Convention.
2007

No Implementation

There was no mention of the disarmament program.

2008

No Implementation

In 2008, a spokesperson for the human rights group Raddho stated that there had been no disarmament in the Casamance.4

  • 4. “Senegal’s Casamance struggles back from 20 years of conflict,” Agence France Presse, May 24, 2008.
2009

No Implementation

There was no mention of the disarmament program.

2010

No Implementation

In 2010, a Senegalese military official told media: “It is certain that they (rebels) have new equipment which they did not before, such as rocket launchers, mortars and machine guns”.5

  • 5. “Violence surges in Casamance as peace process stays blocked,” Agence France Presse, December 30, 2010.
2011

No Implementation

In 2011, the press reported that “the demobilisation, disarmament and reinsertion of some 2,000 fighters…has never been carried out”.6

  • 6. “Senegal’s president wants to reintegrate rebels,” Agence France Presse, Feb 18, 2011.
2012

No Implementation

In his 2012 new year’s speech, Senegalese President Wade said he would facilitate the process of social reintegration of rebels after disarmament and demobilization.7 President Wade later also proposed what he termed a ‘DDP plan’ for the Casamance: disarmament, demining, projects.8

  • 7. “Dakar Bishop and Wade in Bid to End Rebellion,” The Nation (Nairobi), January 2, 2012.
  • 8. “Senegal’s Wade woos voters in strife-torn Casamance,” Agence France Presse, February 11, 2012.
2013

No Implementation

No developments observed this year.

2014

No Implementation

No developments observed this year.