Disarmament: General Agreement on the Establishment of Peace and National Accord in Tajikistan

Protocol on Military Issues (8 March 1997)

I. General Provisions:

1. The reintegration, disarmament and disbandment of the armed units of the United Tajik Opposition as well as the reform of the governmental power structures of the Republic of Tajikistan shall be carried out during the transition period by the President of the Republic of Tajikistan and the Commission on National Reconciliation in close cooperation with the United Nations Mission of Observers in Tajikistan (UNMOT) and in accordance with the timetable set forth in paragraphs 5, 9 and 11 of this Protocol.

2. The practical implementation of the provisions of this Protocol shall be carried out by a subcommission on military issues of the Commission on National Reconciliation and also by a joint central review board established on the basis of parity.

Statute on the Commission of National Reconciliation, III. Functions and Powers of the Commission:

II. THE REINTEGRATION, DISARMAMENT AND DISBANDMENT OF THE ARMED UNITS OF THE UNITED TAJIK OPPOSITION:

7. The Commission shall have the following functions and powers:

Guidance and monitoring of the disbandment, disarming and reintegration of the armed units of the opposition armed forces and conduct of activities to reform the authorities responsible for the maintenance of law and order and the agencies of the Office of the Public Prosecutor;

Implementation History

1997

No Implementation

It was reported that UTO fighters were reluctant to disarm due to the government's weak commitment on general amnesty and the fact that UTO representatives were not receiving high-ranking government positions, particularly, in one of the three "power" ministries: Interior, Security or Defense.1 

  • 1. Grant R. Smith, “Tajikistan: The Rocky Road to Peace,” Central Asian Survey 18, no. 2 (1999):243-251.
1998

Minimum Implementation

In July, 153 UTO fighters were repatriated from Afghanistan with a large number of weapons and ammunition by UNMOT.2 Around 36 percent of UTO fighters turned in weapons at registration sites in 1998 according to UNMOT reports.3 

  • 2. "Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation in Tajikistan," United Nations (S/1998/754), August 13, 1998.
  • 3. Stina Torjesen and S. Neil MacFarlane, "R before D: The Case of Post-Conflict Reintegration in Tajikistan," Conflict, Security & Development 7, no. 2 (2007): 311-332.
1999

Minimum Implementation

On 5 January 1999, the CNR issued a formal resolution for all UTO fighters to return to the assembly areas and turn in their weapons.4 Following the public declaration of disbandment from Nuri, a subsequent disarmament campaign was conducted from 5 to 25 of August with members of the CNR. The Secretary General reported that few weapons were collected.5 

  • 4. "Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation in Tajikistan," United Nations (S/1999/124), February 8, 1999.
  • 5. "Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation in Tajikistan," United Nations (S/1999/1127), November 4, 1999.
2000

Minimum Implementation

Disarmament, as a formal process, was disregarded and the CNR was closed.6 

  • 6. A. Kannangara, N. Solijonov and S. Khoshmukhamedov, "Outcome Evaluation Report: Sustainable Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration of Ex-combatants and Conversion of Military Assets to Civilian Use," Dushanbe: UNDP Tajikistan, 2004.
2001

Minimum Implementation

No subsequent disarmament programs took place in Tajikistan.

2002

Minimum Implementation

No further developments observed.

2003

Minimum Implementation

No further developments observed.

2004

Minimum Implementation

No further developments observed.

2005

Minimum Implementation

No further developments observed.

2006

Minimum Implementation

No further developments observed.