Decentralization/Federalism: Ohrid Agreement

3. Development of Decentralized Government

3.1. A revised Law on Local Self-Government will be adopted that reinforces the powers of elected local officials and enlarges substantially their competencies in conformity with the Constitution (as amended in accordance with Annex A) and the European Charter on Local Self- Government, and reflecting the principle of subsidiarity in effect in the European Union. Enhanced competencies will relate principally to the areas of public services, urban and rural planning, environmental protection, local economic development, culture, local finances, education, social welfare, and health care. A law on financing of local self-government will be adopted to ensure an adequate system of financing to enable local governments to fulfill all of their responsibilities.

3.2. Boundaries of municipalities will be revised within one year of the completion of a new census, which will be conducted under international supervision by the end of 2001. The revision of the municipal boundaries will be effectuated by the local and national authorities with international participation.

3.3. In order to ensure that police are aware of and responsive to the needs and interests of the local population, local heads of police will be selected by municipal councils from lists of candidates proposed by the Ministry of Interior, and will communicate regularly with the councils. The Ministry of Interior will retain the authority to remove local heads of police in accordance with the law.

ANNEX C: IMPLEMENTATION AND CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES

4. Development of Decentralized Government

4.1. The parties invite the international community to assist in the process of strengthening local self-government. The international community should in particular assist in preparing the necessary legal amendments related to financing mechanisms for strengthening the financial basis of municipalities and building their financial management capabilities, and in amending the law on the boundaries of municipalities.

Implementation History

2001

Minimum Implementation

On 6 December2001, the draft Law on Local Self-Government was introduced in the assembly.1 Even though Albanian minority liked the draft law, it was introduced way behind the original schedule. 

  • 1. "Macedonia: Albanian deputy backs draft Law on Local Self-Government," BBC Monitoring Europe, December 7, 2001.
2002

Intermediate Implementation

As the controversy on local self-government continued in the assembly, the ethnic Albanian rebel vowed to reactivate the disbanded National Liberation Army.2

On 22 January 2002, party leaders in Macedonia agree on draft law on local self-government. The law on local self-government was expected to be adopted by assembly later that week.3 The Macedonian parliament approved a new law on local self-government on 24 January but, boundaries of municipalities were not redrawn in 2002.4

  • 2. "Albanian guerrillas threaten to resume Macedonian insurgency," Center for Peace in the Balkans, B92, January 12, 2002.
  • 3. "Party leaders in Macedonia agree on draft law on local self-government," BBC Monitoring Europe, January 22, 2002.
  • 4. "MACEDONIA HAS A NEW LAW ON LOCAL SELF-GOVERNMENT," IPR Strategic Business Information Database, February 5, 2002.
2003

Intermediate Implementation

Law on local self-government was adopted in 2002. However, boundaries of municipalities were not redrawn in 2003.

2004

Law on local self-government was adopted in 2002. Boundaries of municipalities were redrawn in 2004.

2005

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2006

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2007

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2008

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2009

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.

2010

Full Implementation

No further developments observed.